April 2024 Newsletter

 

Coastal Haiti Mission Newsletter

 

                   April 2024

 

                                       ELEPHANTUS

 Years ago I saw a documentary about rogue “teen-age” elephants who were

tormenting and killing White Rhinoceros, an animal listed as an endangered

species. The young elephants would fill their trunks with water and spray the

unsuspecting rhinos, causing more than a little annoyance and aggravation.

 

As I recall, the juvenile elephantus had been taken from their herd and were

transported to another part of their country in an effort to reproduce in that

area.  For awhile, all efforts to change the behavior of the young bullies had

failed until one idea was productive. Mature male elephants were brought

into the area who then taught the undisciplined troublemakers how to live and let

live.  Killing of the rhinos soon ended!

 

You might say the youngsters were “mentored” by the adult elephants, which

brings me to my point.  I believe we need more mentors in the Body of Christ.

Especially – but not exclusively – for new Christians of all ages.  Too often, it

seems to me, new Christians are left alone to traverse this new way of life

without adequate guidance and care.  (One or two hours on Sunday morning, and

maybe one hour midweek is not enough.)  They need loving, caring, and available

adults, mature in the faith, to take them by the hand and work to strengthen them

as they begin their walk with Jesus.  And, yes, I think they need a decent serving

of theology, church history, and perhaps some knowledge of apologetics.  Both

the Nicene and Apostles creeds are adequate sources of basic Christianity.

 

They need to know about the Trinity, the necessity of baptism, and the sacredness

of communion.  To know that when they partake of the bread and cup, they are

identifying with believers throughout the world of every race, color, and tribe.

 

How many new Christians have been discouraged because they were not prepared

to give a concise and intelligent answer concerning their conversion experience

to unbelieving spouses, family, and friends?  They need to know how to identify

and link their experience with Jesus Christ to that of millions who, for over the last

2,000 years have chosen to follow the Good Shepherd.  They need to understand

the bond and affiliation they have with the early church fathers, missionaries and

pioneers from whom all Christian denominations have eventually come into being.

 

Unbelieving family members need to know their loved one has not joined a cult.

I have personally known of two instances where Christians were called cult

members following their conversions to Christ.  They both attended a Baptist

Church (certainly not a cult)!

Also, I don’t think that new believers should be called upon to teach a Sunday

School class.  They need to be seated in the congregation on Sunday mornings.

They need time for growth.  As Paul said to the church in Corinthians (all new

Christians):  “What we’re hoping for is that as your lives GROW IN FAITH,

you’ll play a part within our expanding work.”  (Embedded  in II Cor. 10:15 The Message)

 

My late husband, Clint Goddard, and I came to the Lord during the Charismatic

Renewal which spread throughout the world in the 1960s.  We were led to the

Lord – one week apart – by a man and his wife living in our neighborhood.  We

were soundly converted!  We were mentored and nurtured by this couple for

many months.  Also, through them, we were introduced to a fellowship called

Full Gospel Business Men’s Fellowship, Inc., giving us access to hours of

lectures and teaching from among some of the most beloved and best Bible

teachers of the day: Derek Prince, Bob Mumford, David Duplisses from

South Africa, Jack Hayford, and others.  Good, solid, Bible teaching.  Building

on the Rock!

 

And so, I know the importance of early instruction and care for the new convert.

I am also aware that many churches do have a class for new believers.  I applaud

that effort.  I hope it goes far enough.  Remember the juvenile elephants?  We

need mentors – one on one. The pastor can’t do it all!

 

Walking this Way with you,

Connie

 

 

The School Lunch Program

 

Pastor Coty Writes:

When we talk about the school lunch program, many people think about the

children as the beneficiaries. Yes, they are the first ones to benefit from the

food, but they are not the only ones. A day without food would be a disaster

and a very strange day for both the students and the teachers. This is because

the food solves one of their common problems. 

 

 

According to our timetable, we serve the food every day at 10 AM. Then,

after lunch, the kids get another 15 minute break so they can relax before

going back to class.

 

 

 

 

Finishing the New School Building 

Pastor Coty Writes:

We always want to thank everyone who contributes to the work for the benefit

of our community.

 

This time we want to thank brother Carl Lamour, who has supported a small

but costly project. It was stuccoing the interior of the 4 classrooms that we had

already built.

 

We are almost finished with the inside.  We hope that someday we can

complete the inside and possibly do the outside work as well.

 

This was a very good start to finishing this school building. 

 

 

Finishing the interior of these classrooms

 

Food for the Needy Program

 

Pastor Coty Writes:

The lady in the photos below is known in the village as a crazy lady, but she

knows to come to the school to get something to eat, every school day. She

comes when she knows that the lunch is ready.

However, we cannot give her enough food to take home, because this food is

for the school children and the teachers. However, as crazy is she, people in

her house are always expecting that she will bring some food to them.

Today she was acting very good. She knew what day it was, and she told me

how she would cook the food, as well as many other good things. Then I took

her to the depot where the food is stored, and I gave her enough food for two

days. I also gave her some money to buy other items to mix with the rice.

I can imagine the joy of the people who live with her, when they saw her

coming with these provisions. As crazy as she is, people who live together with

her, are counting on her to eat some days.

Eating is still an occasional thing for many people. Helping them to get

something to eat is always a good ministry.

It takes peoples’ effort, and money to help in this way, but the results are

significant, and the eternal rewards will be even greater.

 

Food to take home.

Saturday Sunday School

Pastor Coty Writes:
When teaching, you always need to keep the attention of the students so that

they get what you teach. The hardest thing most of the time is to have them

want to come to the class. For us, we say Praise the Lord, because we find a

way of having the kids want to come to class. In the village the kids don’t have

any other religion. They all confess Jesus as their personal Savior, and they

know bible quotations much better than the adults. Some come to church on

Sunday, while others don’t come, but all know Jesus, and this is our joy. They

don’t want to miss the Saturday Class any reason.  

When they come to the class on Saturday, there are two things that they may

not know: first is the subject they will study for that day, and second is what

they will get to eat for that day. But for sure, they will study a lesson and for

sure, they will get something to eat. It is the second reason why none of them

would want to miss a class.

 

It is the treats that encourages them to come.

 

 

The Drought Resistant Garden Project

Pastor Coty Writes:

Today is a very special day for the students. They have been invited to

participate in a training session, taught by Agronomists Yamoutch Bazile and

Jean Ely Toussaint (Jeff). I could feel the joy of the students as they

participated in this extra class. Nobody complained of being required to

attend this class.

 

A most important lesson

 

 

Life in the Village

Pastor Coty Writes:

Sometimes people may ask, “how do the village people cook when they are

away from home?” These images will show one way. It is a very old way of

creating a fire for cooking.

First a hole is dug next to some rocks. The rocks will support the pan. The

hole is shaped such that the firewood will be placed under the pan. This is a  

fast way of making a cooking fire.

 

 

Lunch in the great outdoors

Proverbs 19:17 ESV
Whoever is generous to the poor lends to the Lord, and He will repay him for
his deed.

 

A blessing for you from the scripture:

2 Thessalonians 3: 16
Now may the Lord of peace himself
give you his peace at all times and in
every situation. The Lord be with you all.

 

 

Thank you, Family and Friends of Coastal Haiti Mission, for all that you do to

help the people in Cahess, Haiti. You are making a huge difference for these

people.

Please remember, that CHM must continue to send our monthly commitment

of $1700 to carry on the ongoing CHM ministry in Cahess. This is in addition

to the cost of the School Lunch Program.

If you desire to help, please send your tax-deductible check to our address and

tell us how you want us to use your donation:

Coastal Haiti Mission

C/O Constance Goddard

3048 Spring Fancy Lane

Indian Trail, NC 28079

Or For tax deductible “online donations”, please use our PayPal service. Also

please designate how you want us to use your donation.




 

May the Lord our God, who knows your heart and sees your actions, grant you

great joy as you serve Him.  Connie, Esther, Pastor Coty, Carl, Dan, and Ken are

very grateful for your sacrifice. Ken Johansson CHM Newsletter Editor

 

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All Rights Reserved.